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Recent Date
7/13/2022
Erik Desousa
13
Jul
2022
5
5
Suerb Experience
7/4/2022
Ema Watson
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2022
5
5
nice Experience
7/3/2022
frank steve
3
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7/2/2022
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Love this experience
7/2/2022
david macroons
2
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6/26/2022
saimon dallas
26
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nice experience
6/19/2022
George Shallow
19
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2022
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Loved this one
6/18/2022
Arham Shahzad
18
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2022
5
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Excellent experience
6/13/2022
Kamelia Stoycheva
13
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6/11/2022
Eva Malcom
11
Jun
2022
4
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Nice experience although it needs more details wrriten
6/10/2022
Ariana Adams
10
Jun
2022
5
5
Loved this guide
6/4/2022
Shane Dana
4
Jun
2022
5
5
lOVED this experience
5/29/2022
Emily Edwards
29
May
2022
5
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cool experience and great details about the tour
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[{"address":"Holocaust Memorial","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.63357272311803,"longitude":22.9379781047248},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2FMEMROIAL.jpg?alt=media&token=a52d8dd1-4826-414d-ae62-9f39e0c8520e"},{"type":"text","content":"Our meeting point, the Holocaust Memorial Monument right in the seaside. The Holocaust memorial in Thessaloniki, Greece, is a significant site commemorating the tragic events of the Holocaust during World War II. Thessaloniki, also known as Salonika, had a vibrant and thriving Jewish community before the war, with a population of approximately 50,000 Jews.\n\nThe memorial is located at the site of the former Jewish cemetery, which was destroyed by the Nazis during the occupation of Greece. It serves as a tribute to the memory of the victims and a reminder of the atrocities committed against the Jewish population.\n\nThe memorial consists of several elements designed to honor the victims and educate visitors about the Holocaust. The centerpiece is a large marble sculpture created by renowned artist Nandor Glid, depicting a broken Magen David (Star of David) with six million holes, symbolizing the six million Jews who perished in the Holocaust. The sculpture stands on a platform surrounded by a symbolic number of empty chairs, representing the absence of the Jewish community that once thrived in Thessaloniki.\n\nAdjacent to the sculpture is an underground exhibition space called the \"Holocaust Education Center,\" which provides historical context, documentation, and personal stories of the Jewish community in Thessaloniki before, during, and after the Holocaust. The exhibition aims to educate visitors about the Holocaust, the rise of anti-Semitism, and the importance of preserving the memory of the victims.\n\nThe memorial serves as a place of remembrance and reflection, encouraging visitors to contemplate the consequences of hatred and prejudice. It is an important symbol of resilience and a commitment to ensuring that the Holocaust is never forgotten.\n\nThe Holocaust memorial in Thessaloniki was inaugurated on March 18, 1997, and has since become a significant cultural and historical landmark in the city. It stands as a testament to the Jewish community's rich heritage and enduring spirit, even in the face of unimaginable tragedy.\n\n"}]},{"address":"Pl. Aristotelous 7","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.63241086726002,"longitude":22.940840495359236},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Faristotle-square-top-1-1280.jpg?alt=media&token=aa20f7b8-b6ab-4e4f-9483-7ca2192ab6a3"},{"type":"text","content":"Our first stop, just 5 minutes away is the iconic Aristotelous Square! Designed by the French architect Ernest Hebrar in 1917 ,Aristotelous Square is the central square of Thessaloniki, Greece. It is one of the city's most iconic landmarks and serves as a popular gathering place for locals and tourists alike. Named after the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle, the square is located in the heart of Thessaloniki, near the city's waterfront."},{"type":"text","content":"Aristotelous Square is known for its grandeur and architectural beauty. It is a large, open space lined with elegant buildings and neoclassical facades. The square is surrounded by cafes, restaurants, luxury boutiques, and shops, making it a vibrant hub of activity. It is a common meeting point for residents and visitors, especially in the evenings when people come to relax, socialize, and enjoy the lively atmosphere."},{"type":"text","content":"At the center of Aristotelous Square, there is a statue of Aristotle, the renowned philosopher who was born in Stageira, a city near Thessaloniki. The statue pays tribute to his intellectual contributions and serves as a symbol of the city's rich historical and cultural heritage."},{"type":"text","content":"The square offers breathtaking views of the Thermaic Gulf and the iconic White Tower, which stands prominently along the waterfront. From Aristotelous Square, visitors can also explore the nearby shopping streets, such as Tsimiski Street and Mitropoleos Street, which are known for their diverse retail offerings."},{"type":"text","content":"Throughout the year, various events and festivals take place in Aristotelous Square, including concerts, cultural exhibitions, and celebrations during holidays and special occasions. The square is particularly festive during the annual Thessaloniki International Fair, one of Greece's largest trade fairs, which attracts exhibitors and visitors from around the world."},{"type":"text","content":"Aristotelous Square underwent extensive renovations in recent years to enhance its appeal and accessibility. Pedestrian-friendly pathways, outdoor seating areas, and a sophisticated lighting system were added, making it an even more enjoyable destination for leisurely strolls and social gatherings."},{"type":"text","content":"Overall, Aristotelous Square is a symbol of Thessaloniki's cosmopolitan character, blending history, culture, and modernity. It stands as a vibrant and dynamic space that showcases the city's charm and provides a meeting point for people from all walks of life."}]},{"address":"JWGX+J9","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.62655931651593,"longitude":22.94842609074914},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2FWHITETOWER1.jpg?alt=media&token=82de434c-320f-4112-add0-4e69f675d39f"},{"type":"text","content":"Next up, the city's most famous sight, the White Tower, or otherwise known as the Beyaz Kule in Turkish. With a height of 34mt (112ft), the White Tower is the city's most known monument and symbol. The White Tower likely replaced an older Byzantine tower mentioned by the 12th-century archbishop Eustathius of Thessalonica during the sack of the city in 1185. The present tower, which once guarded the eastern end of the city's sea walls, was for many years attributed to Venice, to which the Byzantines ceded Thessaloniki in 1423. It is now known that the tower was constructed by the Ottomans sometime after the army of Sultan Murad II captured Thessaloniki in 1430. Until 1912, an inscription in Ottoman Turkish verse above the door attributes the tower's construction to AH 942 (1535–1536) on the orders of Sultan Suleiman. The historian Franz Babinger speculated that the structure was designed by the great Ottoman architect Mimar Sinan, who is known to have built fortifications, including a similar tower at the Albanian port Valona in 1537."}]},{"address":"Περίπτερο","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.624199669503966,"longitude":22.949992980909283},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Fmonument-alexander-great-thessaloniki-scaled.jpg?alt=media&token=04c5adb0-ac5a-48ee-91d1-eb841b7cab66"},{"type":"text","content":"Just a few steps away, the Alexander The Great statue.The Alexander the Great statue in Thessaloniki is a prominent monument dedicated to the renowned ancient Macedonian king, Alexander III of Macedon, commonly known as Alexander the Great. The statue is located in the city center, near the waterfront, and holds great significance for Thessaloniki and its connection to Alexander's legacy.\n\nThe statue portrays Alexander the Great on horseback, capturing his military leadership and legendary status. It stands tall at approximately 6.5 meters (21 feet) and is made of bronze. The equestrian statue was created by the sculptor Evangelos Moustakas and was unveiled in 1973.\n\nThe decision to erect the Alexander the Great statue in Thessaloniki was motivated by the city's historical ties to Alexander. Thessaloniki was founded by Cassander, one of Alexander's generals, in 315 BC and named after his wife, Thessalonike, who was Alexander's half-sister. The city played a significant role in the Macedonian Empire and became an important cultural and economic center in the region.\n\nThe statue of Alexander the Great in Thessaloniki symbolizes the city's pride in its historical heritage and connection to the ancient world. It serves as a tribute to Alexander's military achievements, his influence on Greek history, and his lasting legacy as one of history's greatest military strategists.\n\nThe statue has become an iconic landmark and a popular tourist attraction in Thessaloniki. It is located in a central location that offers stunning views of the Thermaic Gulf, making it an ideal spot for visitors to take photographs and admire the statue's grandeur. The area surrounding the statue is often bustling with tourists and locals who gather to appreciate the monument and enjoy the vibrant atmosphere of the city.\n\nIt is worth noting that the statue of Alexander the Great in Thessaloniki has also sparked some controversy and debates over its historical and political implications. While Alexander the Great is celebrated by many as a national hero and an iconic figure in Greek history, his legacy is complex and subject to different interpretations.\n\nOverall, the Alexander the Great statue in Thessaloniki stands as a significant tribute to the city's connection to the ancient world and serves as a reminder of the historical and cultural richness of the region."}]},{"address":"Άν. Κεραμοπούλου 9","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.63293934301469,"longitude":22.947001686182883},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2F93786_Hagia-Sophia-Thessaloniki-09.jpg?alt=media&token=b5eb50d8-f3be-44d8-84b8-187b3a3a33a2"},{"type":"text","content":"Next up, we will be visiting the city's oldest church Agia Sophia.\nSince the 3rd century, there was a church in the location of the current Hagia Sophia. In 620, that church collapsed most likely because of an earthquake. Later in the 7th century, the present structure was erected, based on the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (present-day Istanbul, Turkey). In 1205, when the Fourth Crusade captured the city, the Hagia Sophia was converted into the cathedral of Thessaloniki, which lasted until 1224, the year when the battalions of the Despotate of Epirus, under Theodore Komnenos Doukas, liberated the city. After the capture of Thessaloniki by the Ottoman Sultan Murad II on 29 March 1430, the church was converted into a mosque. It was reconverted to a church upon the liberation of Thessaloniki in 1912.\nIn the Iconoclastic era, the apse of the church was embellished with plain gold mosaics with only one great cross, similarly to the Hagia Irene in Constantinople and the Church of the Dormition in Nicaea. The cross was substituted with the image of the Theotokos (God-bearer, or Mary) in 787-797 after the victory of the Iconodules. The mosaic in the dome now represents the Ascension with the inscription from Acts 1:11 \"Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven?\". The dome is ringed by the figures of all Twelve Apostles, Mary and two angels."}]},{"address":"Dim. Gounari 43","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.63233520407298,"longitude":22.95174703795961},"media":[{"type":"text","content":"Our next stop, the ancient Arch of Galerius! Built to celebrate the victory of tetrarch Galerius at the Battle of Satala. The Arch of Galerius stands on what is now the intersection of Egnatia and Dimitriou Gounari streets. Construction of the arch was spanned the years 298 and 299 AD; it was dedicated in 303 AD to celebrate the victory of the tetrarch Galerius over the Sassanid Persians at the Battle of Satala and the capture of their capital Ctesiphon in 298. Understanding of the sculptural program of the arch is limited by the loss of the majority of the marble panels, but the remains give an impression of the whole. Four vertically stacked registers of sculpted decoration were carved on each pillar, each separated by elaborate moldings. A label for the Tigris River indicates that there were likely labels on other representations as the builders deemed necessary. Artistic license was taken in the representations, for instance, the Caesar Galerius is shown in personal combat with the Sassanid Shah Narses in one of the panels; although they never met in battle.[citation needed] On the arch a mounted Galerius attacks a similarly mounted Narses with a lance as an eagle bearing a victory wreath in its talons approaches Galerius. The Caesar sits securely on his rearing horse, while the Persian king appears nearly unhorsed. Terrified Persians cower under the hooves of the Caesar's horse in the chaos of battle. The panel expresses the power of the Caesar Galerius."},{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Fkarama3.png?alt=media&token=e4b090e7-a86f-4a8f-ba0c-4d06cf9aa7db"}]},{"address":"Πλ. Αγίου Γεωργίου Ροτόντα 5","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.63342834549025,"longitude":22.95303518146763},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Fimage33188%5B2452%5D.jpg?alt=media&token=34088a6e-3b7e-46a9-9f75-f1f72ac2b5e2"},{"type":"text","content":"Just a few steps away, the beautiful church of Agios Georgios, Rotunda.\nThe Arch of Galerius and Rotunda, these two structures as elements of an imperial precinct linked to his Thessaloniki palace. Archeologists have found substantial remains of the palace to the southwest. These three monumental structures were connected by a road that ran through the arch, which rose above the major east–west road of the city.\nAt the crux of the major axes of the city, the Arch of Galerius emphasized the power of the emperor and linked the monumental structures with the fabric of 4th-century Thessaloniki. The arch was composed of a masonry core faced with marble sculptural panels celebrating a victory over Narses (Narseh), the seventh emperor in the Sassanid Persian Empire, in 299 AD."}]},{"address":"Ζωγράφου 4","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.638488731884934,"longitude":22.95985080881589},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Fpashagardens3.png?alt=media&token=93344029-02d7-4989-ab51-eab25f9417a7"},{"type":"text","content":"Then, we will walk around the Pasha's Gardens to view all faux ruins to get a glimpse of the ancient life of Thessaloniki!\nOn the northern side of Agios Dimitrios hospital and east to Kastron street, very near to Saint Paul church, it is a green oasis with pine trees and unusual, half-ruined stone structures. This imaginative, Gaudí-style architecture centers around an ornate fountain encircled by a tunnel leading nowhere. There is also a cistern to collect rainwater, a seating area, and a small gate leading underground.\n\nThe Pasha’s Gardens were constructed in 1904 and they are the only integrated creation of the architectural trend of visionary architecture in Thessaloniki. The name of the garden suggests the pleasant feeling the position of the garden gives to visitor, with children's corners for recreation and a seating area to admire the views of the city.\n\n"}]},{"address":"2nd High School of Sykies","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.64499813113947,"longitude":22.961812369742738},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Fheptapyrgion.jpg?alt=media&token=f279aaee-f044-4930-917b-69e123ceb18d"},{"type":"text","content":"See this medieval fortress? Well, that's one of our last stops! The well known Heptapyrgion , or Yedi Kule, of Thessaloniki, in which we will of course stop to admire the breathtaking view of the city!\nThe principal reliable testimony regarding the fortress is the inscription placed over its gate, which indicates that it was rebuilt by Çavuş Bey, the city's first Ottoman governor, in 1431, immediately after the Ottoman conquest of the city:\n\nThis acropolis was conquered and captured by force, from the hands of the infidels and the Franks, with the aid of God, by the Sultan Murad, son of Sultan Mehmed, whom God never ceases to give the banner of victory. And about a month later, this tower was rebuilt and founded by Çavuş Bey, king of the emirs and the Great, in the month of Ramadan, the year 834 (1431 AD).\n\nRather than a new construction, which has been disproved by archaeology, the work of Çavuş Bey may have been limited to the restoration of the bastions over the fort's monumental entrance. In a 1591 account, the fort, referred to as the Iç Kale (\"Inner Castle\"), serves as the residence of the city's military governor and has a 300-strong garrison. Another inscription, lost today but known from the writings of the 17th-century Ottoman traveller Evliya Çelebi, testified to another restoration in 1646.\n\nAn inventory of the arms and munitions contained in the various forts of the city in 1733 provides the Turkish names for the ten towers: Fener Kulesi (Lamp Tower), Makaslı Kule (Bent Tower), Su Kulesi (Water Tower), Cephane Kulesi (Ammunition Tower), Hapishane Kulesi (Prison Tower), Kız Kulesi (Maiden Tower), Zahire Ambar Kulesi (Granary Tower), Hisar Peçe (Barbican), Kanlı Burgaz (Bloody Tower), and the Çingene Tabyalar (Fortifications of the Gypsies). The latter three were considered as individual forts, unlike the others, which are classified as simple towers.\n\nIn the late 19th century, the fortress fell out of use as a military installation and was converted into a prison.\n\n"}]},{"address":"Aigli Geni Hamam","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.63893611075026,"longitude":22.94781813821135},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Fsaintdemetrios.jpg?alt=media&token=8e84e41a-cb65-4d32-9e86-b14ee56aeff7"},{"type":"text","content":"Next up, the infamous Church of Saint Demetrios!\nThis is the city's largest church (UNESCO World Heritage) and the main sanctuary dedicated to its patron saint, Agios Dimitrios; it stands on the presumed site of his martyrdom c 306. Restored after the fire in 1917, in line with the original architectural plans, the church has retained some features that are of incomparable historical and artistic interest: the 7C Byzantine mosaics decorating the pillars on either side of the entrance to the apse are remarkably delicate and refined.\n\nSaint Demetrios was born in Thesaloniki, Greece in 270 AD. He came from a wealthy family and because he was athletic in appearance and heroic in spirit, he became a high-ranking officer in the Roman Army at a very young age. (This is why he is depicted in Byzantine icons in military dress, either standing or riding a horse.) He considered himself a soldier of Christ first, and a military soldier second. He spent most of his time as a devout missionary, preaching the Gospel at secret meetings and converting pagans to the Christian faith.\n\nAt one of these meetings, he was captured and placed in front of the Emperor Maximian, who wanted to learn the truth about the conversions. Saint Demetrios proclaimed his faith by saying: \"...only in Christ do I believe.\" With that proclamation, Maximian ordered that Saint Demetrios be sent to prison and subjected to the cruelest tortures.\n\nEven though Saint Demetrios was imprisoned, he did not stop preaching the gospel to those who came to see him. In jail, he was visited by his follower, Nestoras. Nestoras was a man of small stature and had come to ask for his beloved teacher's blessing to fight in the upcoming gladiator games. The emperor had decided to use the games as a duel between Christianity and paganism by challenging any Christian to a fight against the athletic giant, Leo.\n\nWith the blessing of Saint Demetrios, Nestoras fought and killed Leo. Enraged at the loss of his favorite gladiator, the emperor commanded that Nestoras be beheaded on the spot. Recognizing that Saint Demetrios was the inspiring power behind Nestoras, the emperor ordered that Saint Demetrios be executed by spear on October 26, 306 AD Christians buried the body of Saint Demetrios at the place of his execution and because of the beautiful scent that emanated from his tomb, he was named Mirovlitis or \"The Myrrh Gusher\".\n\nThe most ancient icons of Saint Demetrios may be found in his temple in Thessaloniki where he is the patron saint. This is not just because he was born and died there, but because the people believe it was his intervention that saved the city during many attacks by Slavic nations, the Bulgarians, Arabs, Saracens and others. Even the liberation of Thessaloniki during the Balkan wars of 1912 coincide with the feast day of Saint Demetrios on October 26th.\n\nIn ancient times, the life of Saint Demetrios was commemorated with celebrations that lasted for months. These celebrations where accompanied by many events such as the famous market named \"Demetria\". Traders and business people from Europe, Egypt, Arabia and Libya came to deal and trade. The festivities were also attended by philosophers, learned men of the time and artists. To this day, Thessaloniki hosts Greece's largest international trade exhibition each year.\n\nThe monument is a five-aisled basilica, with a narthex and a transept. Under the sanctuary and the transept there is the crypt. A chapel of Saint Euthymios is attached to the south-east corner of the church. Very few fragments of the sculptural and pictorial (mosaics, wall paintings) decoration of the church, survived the disastrous fire of 1917 but they are representative of the successive phases of the monument's history.\n\nThe first church was a small oratory, built shortly after 313 A.D. on the ruins of a Roman bath. In the 5th century A.D., the eparch Leontios founded on the same site a large, three-aisled basilica which was burnt down in 626-634. Shortly thereafter, the five-aisled basilica was erected. It was converted into a mosque in 1493, it was restored to Christian worship in 1912 but it was again destroyed in the great fire of 1917. It was rebuilt and started to function again in 1949.\n\n"}]},{"address":"Roman Forum of Thessaloniki","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.63725897142757,"longitude":22.946369745343308},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Fgreece-central-macedonia-thessaloniki-ruins-of-ancient-roman-forum-RUNF04160.jpg?alt=media&token=553524f5-6956-46b8-a244-fd0cb55c1c5c"},{"type":"text","content":"And our last sight, the Roman Forum of Thessaloniki! We will see the ruins of the ancient forum and learn a lot about them!\nThe Roman Forum of Thessaloniki is the ancient Roman-era forum of the city, located at the upper side of Aristotelous Square.\n\nIt is a large two-terraced forum featuring two-storey stoas, dug up by accident in the 1960s. The forum complex also boasts two Roman baths, one of which has been excavated while the other is buried underneath the city, and a small theater which was also used for gladiatorial games. Although the initial complex was not built in Roman times, it was largely refurbished in the 2nd century.[2] It is believed that the forum and the theater continued to be used until at least the 6th century.\n\nThe area of the forum was planned to be the site of the Thessaloniki Municipal Courthouse (in Greek: Δικαστικό Μέγαρο), but after the ruins were discovered during the excavation, the project was scrapped. While the courthouse building was relocated, the intended name of the square (\"Courthouse/Dikastirion Square\") still survives in popular use. The official name of the square however is \"of Ancient Agora (Archaias Agoras)\".\n\n"}]},{"address":"Stin taratsa","location":{"longitudeDelta":0.10218818160659443,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.63787581596312,"longitude":22.93936823722639},"media":[{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2FwU2chiRzTpAg2S4aZxPI%2Furania-cover-final.jpg?alt=media&token=9f9e0b2c-b4aa-4bc7-bfae-af3bddde6ae4"},{"type":"text","content":"After this tiring but awesome day, what better than a drink on a rooftop? So, our last stop is this amazing rooftop with a cold beer :) !"}]}]
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Meet Your Guide
4.8
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rating
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Olga K
Greece

Hi there! My name is Olga, I am a film student in love with traveling and with my beautiful city Thessaloniki! I love meeting new people, seeking discomfort and walking my dog or myself. Feel free to reach me about anything you need.

Meet Your Guide
4.8
rating
26
followers
Olga Karantoni
Greece

Hello there! I´m Olga a travel and arts enthusiast living in the beautiful city of Thessaloniki! All of my tours can be completed with a tour guide upon discussion.

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Erik Desousa
7/13/2022
5
Suerb Experience
7/13/2022
Ema Watson
7/4/2022
5
nice Experience
7/4/2022
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