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6/10/2022
Chris Shanlin
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2022
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6/10/2022
Chris Shanlin
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2022
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6/7/2022
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6/4/2022
Daniel Wasilewsky
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2022
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This is actually amazing! I lived the audio on each stop
6/4/2022
Daniel Wasilewsky
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2022
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This is actually amazing! I lived the audio on each stop
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[{"location":{"latitude":40.752859193449744,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"longitude":-74.00225436451426,"longitudeDelta":0.14321712068773834},"media":[{"content":"# Welcome","type":"text"},{"type":"audio","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2Fintro.mp3?alt=media&token=22883239-ae1c-4669-b59e-4ab20c5cf043"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FHigh_Line_Digital_Pocket_Guide-1.png?alt=media&token=fb5c2383-8e76-4992-a196-d7cf9d116572","version":1,"type":"img","metadata":{"width":744,"height":1600}},{"type":"link","content":"thehighline.org/donate"},{"content":"[Donate and support The High Line](https://thehighline.org/donate)","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FHistory.mp3?alt=media&token=2b5b7abf-ced4-4485-9ee1-0d109f88bb60","type":"audio"},{"version":1,"metadata":{"height":1600,"width":648},"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FHigh_Line_Digital_Pocket_Guide-2.png?alt=media&token=5ab6c31d-370a-4f25-aa0f-e5b51768a053"},{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FHigh_Line_Digital_Pocket_Guide-4.png?alt=media&token=917e75a7-bcba-4c8d-adcd-fe8fc2ee32b6","version":1,"metadata":{"width":672,"height":1600}},{"metadata":{"height":1600,"width":729},"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FHigh_Line_Digital_Pocket_Guide-3.png?alt=media&token=7f5583ac-2345-443e-ab1a-ea8e9a9881be","version":1,"type":"img"}],"address":"Strictly Cycling Collective"},{"media":[{"content":"# Freedom’s Stand\n\n#### Faheem Majeed\n###### (Sept 2022 – Aug 2023)","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2F1.mp3?alt=media&token=131107eb-3c7a-4c12-a6d8-86ec0d5d6aaa","type":"audio"},{"content":"Faheem Majeed (b. 1976, Chicago, Illinois) lives and works in Chicago, Illinois. Freedom’s Stand pays homage to the role of Black newspapers in the US and is named for Freedom’s Journal, the first Black-owned-and-operated newspaper, founded in New York City in 1827. Modeled after Dogon architecture, the sculpture showcases collections of printed materials that are rotated throughout the exhibition—namely 288 headlines, articles, and advertisements from contemporary and historical Black newspapers.","type":"text"},{"version":1,"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2Fscrnli_04_06_2022_03-50-49.png?alt=media&token=cc27017e-3e56-4dde-b825-85b7b7265d14","type":"img","metadata":{"width":1000,"height":665}},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2Fscrnli_04_06_2022_03-50-52.png?alt=media&token=99acf8bb-0452-4717-a71a-1d7d3d647799","metadata":{"height":933,"width":833},"version":1,"type":"img"}],"address":"Strictly Cycling Collective","location":{"latitude":40.752815625874995,"longitudeDelta":0.14321712068773834,"longitude":-74.00218655140525,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421}},{"address":"507 W 27th St","media":[{"type":"text","content":"# Observer, Observed\n\n#### Julia Phillips\n###### (Sept 2022 – Aug 2023)"},{"type":"audio","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2F2.mp3?alt=media&token=7fe1dc19-9976-4ce5-b15a-d4052c7c842f"},{"content":"Observer II 2020\nCeramic, stainless steel, quartzite\n77¾ × 39 × 39 inches; 198 × 99 × 99 cm\n\n“In my work many of the subject-object relationships are controlling and oppressive. I am starting to become interested in those relations where it’s not clear which side you’d rather stand on. One work that feeds into this idea is Observer (2016). Observation is something that can happen with a whole range of intentions, and it can happen within a trustful relationship.”\n\n—Julia Phillips\n\nWith its adjustable ceramic “gaze” mounted to a stainless-steel support, Observer II resembles publicly accessible binoculars commonly found at tourist destinations. Each end of the double-sided viewfinder features fleshy glazing, suggesting that looking at or observing someone is not a passive or one-sided engagement, but rather an act that implicates both the viewer and the viewed.\n\nPartly inspired by Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, the sculpture questions the responsibility inherent in the act of observing, whether in an intimate situation or an anonymous one, like lurking on social media.","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2F47034_07.jpg?alt=media&token=3a9033b8-f7e9-4ecd-aefd-ca837524c7f5","version":1,"type":"img","metadata":{"height":1501,"width":1000}},{"version":1,"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2F47034_02.jpg?alt=media&token=77677d0a-7b28-4c22-8ce2-69344fdd920a","type":"img","metadata":{"width":1000,"height":1251}},{"type":"img","content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2F47034_10_2021-03-10-183358.jpg?alt=media&token=71c09ddb-23a7-42ab-8ad3-3252c61b62cb","metadata":{"width":1000,"height":715},"version":1}],"location":{"longitudeDelta":0.14321712068773834,"longitude":-74.00287118393054,"latitude":40.75056599464177,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421}},{"media":[{"content":"# Windy\n\n#### Meriem Bennani\n###### (June 2022 – May 2023)","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2F3.mp3?alt=media&token=501a90d7-ffc4-4677-86a4-f7023fc5e8f9","type":"audio"},{"type":"text","content":"With Windy, she will comment on the experience of walking on the High Line through the mechanics of the sculpture itself.\n\n“In developing the concept for Windy, I knew it could not be a static sculpture but needed to echo the dynamic and constant movements of the High Line,” the artist said in a statement. “I wanted to play with New York City’s energy after the past couple years which alternated between engaging with it and carefully hiding from it.”\n\nShe added, “I wanted to try something that presented me with new conceptual and technical challenges to expand my understanding of sculpture, moving image, and the creative possibilities of their shared interaction.”"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FHigh_Line_Digital_Pocket_Guide-cropped-2.png?alt=media&token=7de1f722-624e-41f5-b31f-7976b7ee9bf0","metadata":{"width":292,"height":193},"version":1,"type":"img"}],"location":{"longitudeDelta":0.14321712068773834,"longitude":-74.00418542999226,"latitude":40.7486724087745,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421},"address":"507 W 24th St"},{"location":{"longitude":-74.00506676618832,"latitude":40.74737462047468,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"longitudeDelta":0.14321712068773834},"address":"Finished Canvas | Furnished Apartments the High Line","media":[{"type":"text","content":"# High Line Mural\n\n#### (Rotating program)"},{"content":"[![Mural](https://i.ibb.co/WVQwk57/Untitled-design-10.png)](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7njPqeK1Ao \"Everything Is AWESOME\")","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2Fmural.mp3?alt=media&token=f63101bf-0322-491d-a45c-6b745ce40809","type":"audio"},{"content":"Jordan Casteel is best known for her portraiture. Her vibrant, larger-than-life canvases portray the gazes, gestures, and lives of the individuals who surround her, including family, friends, her students, fellow subway riders, and people she meets on the sidewalk. Casteel works from hundreds of photographs, which allow her to spend hours incorporating the many small details that bring her paintings to life. She paints her subjects as they choose to be seen in their homes or places of work—with friends or family, and the objects that surround them. Inspired by painters such as Alice Neel and Faith Ringgold, Casteel thinks through histories of portrait painting and the ways it creates the world as much as reflects it.\n\nThe mural The Baayfalls recreates a painting on canvas of the same name originally made in 2017. The Baayfalls is a double portrait of Fallou—a woman Casteel befriended during her artist residency at The Studio Museum in Harlem—and Fallou’s brother, Baaye Demba Sow. The pair are pictured outside the museum at Fallou’s table, where she sold hats she designed. When Fallou’s brother arrived in New York from Senegal, Casteel asked the two to sit for a portrait. The title references Baye Fall, a sect of the Sufi brotherhood Mouride, of which Fallou’s brother is a member. The gesture Fallou makes with her left hand signifies Allah among members of Baye Fall.\n\nCasteel’s work for the High Line extends the Harlem sidewalk to the park, connecting public spaces of different neighborhoods across the city. Through her portraiture, Casteel adds deeply nuanced expressions of human experience to the expanding collection of images we see every day.","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FExample%201%20(3).png?alt=media&token=f5f30d6d-ca48-45fb-9bd8-ba6da75707bf","version":1,"type":"img","metadata":{"width":564,"height":820}}]},{"location":{"longitudeDelta":0.14321712068773834,"longitude":-74.00686398098928,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"latitude":40.74343879710776},"media":[{"type":"text","content":"# You know who I am\n\n#### Paola Pivi\n###### (Apr 2022 – Mar 2023)"},{"metadata":{"width":1000,"height":668},"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FPivi-Rendering-010622.jpg?alt=media&token=6cc8cdc0-0c73-4237-9610-201639f7cacf","version":1,"type":"img"},{"content":"Paola Pivi’s interdisciplinary artistic practice combines the familiar with the bizarre. She is known for transposing live animals and common objects—ranging from helicopters to cappuccinos—to unexpected settings. Some of her best-known striking tableaux include Untitled (zebras), two zebras standing on a snowy mountain—shown on the High Line Billboard in 2012—as well as 84 goldfish flying coach, and a gallery filled with frolicking feathered polar bears in highlighter-bright hues. In all her work, Pivi uses strategies of displacement and overabundance to disorient and shift viewers’ expectations of rules, categories, and boundaries. Her parallel universes offer opportunities to shift points of view on divisions we take for granted.\n\nYou know who I am is a large-scale cast bronze replica of the Statue of Liberty wearing various cartoonish masks. The masks are stylized portraits of individuals whose personal experiences of freedom are directly connected to the United States. The masks will change every two months, representing six different people over the course of the exhibition. The work stands twenty-three feet above the High Line on the Northern Spur Preserve. From this vantage, visitors can also see the original Lady Liberty to the south in New York Harbor. Pivi’s replica was manufactured at Fonderia Artistica Battaglia, a bronze casting foundry established in Milan in 1913. This replica follows a direct line to the original sculpture by Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi. To create a scale replica, Pivi worked from a historic plaster cast of the original bronze model created by Bartholdi himself, which is now on view at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.\n\nThe six emoji-inspired masks are playful and colorful, contrasting the streamlined, lighthearted portraiture of personalized digital cartoons with the staid monumentality of the statue. Each mask represents an individual whose experience of freedom is connected to the United States, offering the sentiment that anyone could be represented within the symbol of the statue. For this commission, Pivi, an Italian artist who has lived in Alaska since 2006, was inspired by her family’s experience. Pivi’s son had been living stateless in India when he adopted Pivi and her husband. The three of them endured a four-year legal battle in India to bring the boy home, a journey that concluded with her son gaining a pathway to citizenship in the US. During this struggle, the Statue of Liberty became an invaluable beacon for Pivi’s son, a symbol of the human rights and freedom that could be possible for him in the US.\n\nFor You know who I am, Pivi expands on her family’s experience, depicting in the masks five additional individuals whose freedom has been connected to the US, and inviting them to share their own stories. For some, their story may be about having gained or hoping to gain greater freedoms upon entering the US; for others, the US may represent a denied dream of freedom. Stories from the six people pictured, beginning with Pivi’s son, will be available for visitors on the High Line’s website. You know who I am engages conversations about legal and symbolic freedoms available in the US, and how these freedoms are sought by people living around the world. In Pivi’s engagement with this subject matter, the artist also considers the US’s limitations on freedom.\n\nPaola Pivi, You know who I am is organized by Cecilia Alemani, Donald R. Mullen Director & Chief Curator of High Line Art and Melanie Kress, High Line Art Associate Curator.","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FPaola.mp3?alt=media&token=704f0cf5-878c-47f7-bc10-3c3a6ab8ff52","type":"audio"},{"content":"### Learn more about the person featured in the sculpture\n\n\nNorbu (using a pseudonym to protect his identity) is one of six individuals whose likeness will grace the sculpture over the course of its installation on the High Line.\n\nPaola Pivi and Karma Culture Brothers, her husband, met Norbu in 2012. He was five years old, living at the Tibetan Children’s Village in Dharamshala, India. Norbu was a Tibetan refugee, living stateless and without identification papers.\n\nUpon recognizing each other in a very emotional meeting, Norbu adopted the couple as his parents, who immediately started the process to legalize the adoption. The next four years were a particularly difficult journey for the three of them. The president of the Tibetan Children’s Village, Mr. Tsewang Yeshi, after initially starting the adoption process, changed his position and started to fight against it six months later, attempting to separate the boy from the family. The reasons behind this change in attitude remains unclear. In order to protect their family, Pivi and Karma filed, and won, a court case in India to prevent their child from being removed from them. Immediately after, they filed a second court case that ratified their legal adoption of Norbu in India.\n\nIn June 2015, Norbu, legally adopted in India by Karma, a US citizen, could begin taking advantage of the rights offered to him by the US. The most important right was that Norbu would become a US citizen himself immediately upon arrival in the US in his father’s custody (this was possible because of a streamlined process for foreign-born children of US citizens enacted in the Child Citizenship Act of 2000). In order to be able to travel to the US, Norbu was granted an immigrant visa as Karma’s immediate relative, as he was his son.\n\nA visa is usually applied onto a person’s passport, but Norbu, who was still living stateless and therefore paperless, did not have one. The US Embassy in New Delhi prepared travel documents for Norbu: a letter written and signed on behalf of the embassy stating that Norbu was in fact himself, which could then be used to travel internationally and onto which a visa could be affixed. In stark contrast, Pivi’s homeland of Italy, would not grant any rights to Norbu as the adopted child of an Italian citizen because he was stateless.\n\nUnfortunately, just days before his paperwork was completed to travel to the US, the Tibetan Children’s Village filed two more court cases against the family. By means of these pending cases, the Tibetan Children’s Village actively managed to block Norbu from leaving India for an additional year and a half.\n\nIn total, it took four years of legal battles while the family was living in India, with 135 hearings, in various District Courts, two High Courts, and the Supreme Court of India. In December 2016, the family finally won all the court cases, and Norbu was able to fly to New York to become a US citizen with all related rights and papers.\n\nIt is not difficult to imagine how much the small boy eagerly longed to move to the US and how intensely he dreamed of visiting the Statue of Liberty.","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FLearn%20more.mp3?alt=media&token=0828c83f-771e-4d32-a69a-09add12079b5","type":"audio"}],"address":"SoulCycle"},{"location":{"latitude":40.74308165300045,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"longitude":-74.00721070579567,"longitudeDelta":0.14321712068773834},"address":"Mike Lindwasser Photography","media":[{"type":"text","content":"# High Line Channel \n\n#### l (Rotating program)"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FChannel.mp3?alt=media&token=4a54872f-ad3d-4c34-a309-09d8d0cf0dcd","type":"audio"},{"content":"Channel is our video art program located on the High Line at 14th Street. We present a rotating program of solo and group exhibitions, historic works as well as new, in video format. Past artworks we’ve screened include videos by Sophia Al-Maria, Camille Henrot, Mary Reid Kelley, and Jacolby Satterwhite, among others.","type":"text"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FSchenck%2BHigh%2BLine%2Bchannels%2B2018_07_18%2BDSC_7745.jpeg?alt=media&token=d7bd0153-d9f1-46cb-8474-5aa5f8862bea","type":"img","metadata":{"height":668,"width":1000},"version":1},{"metadata":{"width":1000,"height":600},"type":"img","version":1,"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2Fbeckman-2.jpg?alt=media&token=c395e5a3-3a48-4922-80da-8f22af3d4871"}]},{"location":{"latitude":40.74049958517766,"latitudeDelta":0.09219986310369421,"longitudeDelta":0.14321712068773834,"longitude":-74.00807559908921},"media":[{"content":"# Women & Children\n\n#### Nina Beier\n###### (May 2022 – Apr 2023)","type":"text"},{"metadata":{"width":1000,"height":1500},"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FFTiAiaIWUAEkQwb.jpg?alt=media&token=d9f12595-c52f-43f8-a462-cb098527d05c","version":1,"type":"img"},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2FTears.mp3?alt=media&token=b0e05503-7e93-4298-83d8-937faf1ab5f2","type":"audio"},{"type":"text","content":"Nina Beier creates still lives in the form of performative sculptures and static assemblages. Her works tease apart a wide variety of cultural references to offer a window into the strange ways our worlds are put together. For example, Beier installed her work Men (2018), a collection of bronze statues of male war heroes, jockeys, and polo players on horses, in the breaking surf along the coast of Nieuwpoort, Belgium. In another work titled Housebroken (2016), Beier exhibited five massive marble guardian lion sculptures in the bathrooms, hallways, and courtyard garden at Kunsthal Ghent, Belgium.\n\nFor the High Line, Beier realizes Women & Children, a fountain composed of found bronze sculptures of women and children. The statues range in style from classical to contemporary, and all depict women and children in the nude, as has been Western art-historical convention. Water streams from the eyes of the sculptures, creating cartoonish tears that point to the fragility projected onto women and children as subjects. The artist’s crying statues reference the materialized gaze of the Fountain of Vision at the Sanctuary of Bom Jesus do Monte in Portugal as well as pop culture icons, such as cartoons dramatically expelling tears or even the crying emoji. The work’s title echoes the phrase “women and children first,” a Victorian-era maritime code of conduct wherein women and children, assumed to be the weakest aboard, should be the first saved in a perilous situation. Women & Children is installed on the High Line at Little West 12th Street where it can be viewed in the ground."},{"content":"https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/freeguides-prod.appspot.com/o/assets%2Ftours%2F3OLCkDOq0zi6ecAEKDvi%2Fscrnli_04_06_2022_04-26-35.png?alt=media&token=dc4acaa1-81cc-40f6-9cee-e9fa219f5a91","version":1,"metadata":{"height":491,"width":1000},"type":"img"}],"address":"49 Little W 12th St"}]
Travel Modes in Directions
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4.6
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FreeGuides Official
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This is the official account for FreeGuides! 😍 We are based in Sydney, Australia. Creating unique experiences for our valuable users!

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Meet Your Guide
4.6
rating
185
followers
FreeGuides Official
Australia

This is the official account for FreeGuides! 😍 We are based in Sydney, Australia. Creating unique experiences for our valuable users!

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Chris Shanlin
6/10/2022
5
Nice Experience
6/10/2022
Chris Shanlin
6/10/2022
5
Excellent experience
6/10/2022
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